the local trust

Oct 1, 2014

horrormetalpunk:

Young Joey Ramone and his guitar..

horrormetalpunk:

Young Joey Ramone and his guitar..

(via warbells)

Sep 2, 2014

http://www.italianarea.it/opera.php?w=PREL_13.jpg&artista=PREL&let=P#alfabeto_artists

(Source: weissesrauschen, via warbells)

Jun 4, 2014

(Source: warbells)

Jun 4, 2014

we-are-star-stuff:

sixpenceee:

Before I get into it, just know the pictures just serve as visual representations, not actual pictures

Okay so anyway, evidence for this theory is the following:

THE FACT THAT HUMANS ARE SO HAIRLESS: 

Only two kind of habitats give rise to hairless animals, an aquatic one and a one below the ground (a naked mole rat for example)

The suggestion that humans have become hairless to prevent overheating has been rendered false because hair can act like a defense against the sun.

This is why camels retain their fur even in the hot dessert environment. 

OUR FAT CELLS

We have ten times the number of fat cells as expected in an animal our size. Only two types of animals have large fat cells: hibernating and aquatic ones. 

In hibernating it’s seasonal fat, but in aquatic it’s all year round. It’s unreasonable to think that we evolved this feature in land because large fat pockets would have just slowed us down. 

Primate babies are always born slender, but human babies start to develop fat even before birth. 

WALKING ON TWO LEGS

So we’re the only mammals that have developed bipedalism. This is a surprise, because walking on 2 legs vs. walking on 4 legs is very disadvantageous. It’s slower, unstable, our organs are vulnerable to damage.

One theory is that if our habitat was flooded, we’d have to walk on two legs to keep our heads above the water.

The only animal who has ever evolved a pelvis like ours, the swamp ape, used this method. 

BREATHING

We have conscious control over our breathing. Every other land animal doesn’t. Mammals like dolphins and seals also conscious control because it tells them how deep they are going to dive and they can estimate how much air they need to inhale.

OTHER DIFFERENCES

Our body is so wasteful of salt and water. Think of tears and our way of sweating. Other land mammals don’t have this. Water mammals do however. 

Okay anyway I hope you learned something. 

Also please remember this is a hypothesis. It’s been severely criticized and may be false. 

Here’s a source and where you can find more information: X

For more interesting posts like this, go here: X

"May be false" it is false and that source is a joke.

From Wikipedia:

The aquatic ape hypothesis (AAH)is a proposal that the evolutionary ancestors of modern humans spent a period of time adapting to a semiaquatic existence. The hypothesis was first proposed by German pathologist Max Westenhfer in 1942, and then independently by English marine biologist Alister Hardy in 1960. After Hardy, the most prominent proponent was Welsh writer Elaine Morgan. The AAH is one of many hypotheses attempting to explain human evolution through a single causal mechanism, but the evolutionary fossil record does not support any such proposal. The proposal itself has been criticized by experts as being internally inconsistent, having less explanatory power than its proponents claim, and suffering from the feature that alternative terrestrial hypotheses are much better supported. The attractiveness of believing in simplistic single-cause explanations over the much more complex, but better-supported models with multiple causality has been cited as a primary reason for the popularity of the idea with non-experts.

  • Hairlessness. Morgan claimed the relatively hairless skin of humans was due to comparable adaptations in aquatic mammals and land-dwelling mammals that have aquatic ancestors as well as those that currently spend much of their time in wet conditions, and what body hair humans do have follows the flow of water over the body. However, humans vary strongly in the amount and distribution of body hair and comparably sized mammals adapted to semi-aquatic lifestyles actually have dense, insulating fur or large, barrel-shaped bodies that retain heat well in water. Hairlessness is only an advantage for aquatic mammals such as whales and dolphins that have spent millions of years adapting to aquatic lifestyles involving diving, fast swimming and migration over long distances. Though a variety of explanations have been proposed for human hairlessness, the best-supported hypothesis involves improved cooling through perspiration; while fur helps cool inactive animals, hairless skin that sweats vigorously is much better at cooling humans who generate body heat through activity.
  • Bipedalism. Some proponents of AAH claim that bipedalism offers numerous advantages in water, including permitting deeper wading, improved balance and reduced strain on the back, hips and knees, as well as improved blood circulation. But bipedialism also gives many advantages on land, particularly lower energy expenditure and the ability of long-distance running which humans do better than most terrestrial mammals. Proponents of the AAH suggest that bipedalism is disadvantageous when comparing humans to medium-sized, terrestrial quadrupeds, but the fossil record shows that the evolution of humans from ape ancestors did not include a period of quadrupedal locomotion. Instead, human evolution features mainly brachiation, suspension and climbing as the primary method of transportation, with a gradual increase in bipedal locomotion over time. In addition, the elongated lower limbs of humans, which is explained by AAH proponents as improving swimming speeds, appears only after the evolution of the genus Homo and biomechanical analysis indicates humans are far too poor swimmers to have derived from an ape ancestor that swam, and pre-human apes would face similar problems.
  • Descended larynx. The human larynx is situated in the throat rather than the nasal cavity, a feature that is shared by some aquatic animals who use it to close off the trachea while diving; it also facilitates taking large breaths of air upon surfacing. However, other terrestrial mammals, such as the red deer, also have a permanently descended larynx. Humans also have a considerable amount of control over their breathing, which is an involuntary reflex for most terrestrial mammals. Breath control is also thought to be preceded by bipedalism, which frees up the muscles of the upper torso from locomotion and allows breathing independent of limb position. Both of these adaptations are thought to derive from improvements in vocalization and the evolution of the ability to speak, and the human larynx is shaped differently from that of aquatic animals, predisposing humans to choking.

Other claims

Rarely presented AAH-arguments point to the human tendency to produce watery psychic tears, and the production of sweat as a cooling mechanism. Morgan has withdrawn previous arguments along this line, given that horses also sweat profusely. It is occasionally argued that humans compared to other apes have reduced olfaction, with claimed convergences observed in other aquatics, e.g. whales; that the protuding human nose would be adapted to keep splashes out of nasal cavities, arguing the semiaquatic proboscis monkey or semiaquatic tapirs as possible convergences; the tendency of partial to full baldness in men; the tendency for human obesity and that human kidneys are better suited for excretion of salt than other apes. Such arguments are generally considered more speculative and are often heavily criticized.

(I’m not even going to adress the fat cells argument because it is simply not true. At all.)

Ellen White describes Morgan’s work as failing to be empirical, not addressing evidence that contradicts the hypothesis, relying on comparative anatomy rather than selection pressure, not predicting any new evidence and failing to address its own shortcomings. White stated that while the hypothesis had the scientific characteristics of explanatory power and public debate, the only reason it has received any actual scholarly attention is due to its public appeal, ultimately concluding the AAH was unscientific. Others have similarly noted the AAH “is more an exercise in comparative anatomy than a theory supported by data.”

May 13, 2014

Fire

Fire

(Source: warbells)

Mar 7, 2014

Jan 29, 2014

(Source: warbells)

Jan 25, 2014

Back hair relaxer.  Get on it

Back hair relaxer. Get on it

Jan 25, 2014

Protect what’s yours

Protect what’s yours

Jan 25, 2014

Jan 25, 2014

They laughed at my cut … I peed my pants on their graves

They laughed at my cut … I peed my pants on their graves

Jan 25, 2014

Jan 25, 2014

Jazzercise

Jazzercise

Jan 23, 2014

(Source: banxx, via pooptaco)

Jan 23, 2014

(Source: warbells)